javascript Tag

Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what’s been happening.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what’s been happening.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what’s been happening.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what’s been happening.
  Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what’s been happening.
Shine's TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community. Here’s the latest roundup from what's been happening.
The TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Each month, the TEL group gather up all the awesome things that Shine folk have been getting up to in and around the community.  Here's the latest roundup:
In this article I will show you how to write safer TypeScript code by leveraging a feature called strictNullChecks. It's quite easy to miss because it's turned off by default, but can help a lot to produce more robust code. I'll also briefly introduce another lesser-known feature of the language called type guards. Some Java full-stack developers (like me) always wanted to have statically typed JavaScript. I remember when starting a new project with GWT and being quite amazed by the possibility of using Java on both sides. Nowadays, many new languages are trying to be a replacement of JavaScript. TypeScript is one of them. I got my first experience with TypeScript when trying early betas of Angular 2. I quite liked a concept of adding static types to JavaScript. However, I also see developers trying to keep the freedom of JavaScript. Fortunately, TypeScript gives developers flexibility to decide what way they want to go and how they want to mix static vs dynamic types. To experiment with these tradeoffs, I decided to use TypeScript for a new React/Redux project. The application is a web SPA which is the front end for a typical SAAS. Users can register/login, adding credit cards, managing api keys, see billing information, etc. All the examples in this article will be from that project and have React+Redux context.
Quite a while back, Google released two new features in BigQuery. One was federated sources. A federated source allows you to query external sources, like files in Google Cloud Storage (GCS), directly using SQL. They also gave us user defined functions (UDF) in that release too. Essentially, a UDF allows you to ram JavaScript right into your SQL to help you perform the map phase of your query. Sweet! In this blog post, I'll go step-by-step through how I combined BigQuery's federated sources and UDFs to create a scalable, totally serverless, and cost-effective ETL pipeline in BigQuery.