Shiner to present at YOW! Connected 2016 – Mobile & IOT

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Shine’s Gareth Jones has been accepted to give a talk at YOW! Connected 2016 – Mobile & Internet of Things! His talk, titled ”Progressive Web Apps: What Has The Web Ever Done For Us?“, will take a look at what some believe to be the future of mobile development.

YOW! Connected 2016 will be on in Melbourne from the 5th-6th October. You can catch more details of Gareth’s talk (and his awesome bio!) over here.

 

The most important thing when picking HTTP status codes

Every couple of months I’m in a meeting where a couple of developers start arguing about which HTTP status codes to use in their RESTful API, or where they decide to not use HTTP status codes at all and instead layer their own error-code system on top of HTTP.

In my experience, HTTP status codes are more than adequate for communicating from servers to clients. Furthermore, it’s preferable to stick with this standard, because that’s what most client and server-side HTTP libraries are used to dealing with.

When it comes to which status code to use, the truth is that most of the time it doesn’t matter, just so long as it falls within the correct range. In this post I’m going to outline what the important ranges are, and when you should use each one.

If you control both the client and server, these guidelines should do just fine. If you’re writing a more generic RESTful service where other people are writing the clients, you may have to be a bit more nuanced. Either way, this rule-of-thumb is a good starting point to work towards the simplest solution possible for your particular problem.

Will Swift be the next king of server side development?

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In June 2015, Apple announced at WWDC that they were open-sourcing the Swift language and its runtime libraries. On December 3rd that year they made good on their promise. In this post I’d like to talk about why this is significant, particularly for server-side developers.

Style Guides and AEM: Fitting a Square Peg in a Round Hole

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There is a push in the industry to code against an external style guide to maintain consistent styling, have a reusable set of components to build applications with and provide a shared vocabulary for teams to communicate. The goal is that any web application built in an organisation can make use of this style guide to re-use existing CSS rules and/or Javascript functions. For example, one of the more well-known and recently-published style guides is the U.S. Web Design Standards, which will enable U.S. government agencies to create a unified user experience throughout their web applications.

When dealing with modern web applications, integrating a style guide is a relatively straightforward process. It often involves leveraging the existing Javascript build tooling to pull assets down via npm, and then having those assets processed as part of the build pipeline along with your application’s styles/scripts. Alternately, you can simply copy-paste a version of your style guide’s artifacts into your application – the quick and dirty way.

However, things are not always this easy. In my experience working with AEM/CQ, integrating a style guide into a project has consistently been a challenge.

To be fair, style guides are not to be blamed for this. AEM’s strict file structure, meta-data (.content.xml files and the like) and reliance on Java technologies can make it challenging to integrate with Javascript-based tooling. Each project generally ends up with a set of custom scripts to achieve this integration, resulting in a solution that is simply not maintainable. If you’ll indulge me for a moment, I’d like to take this opportunity to run through a few solutions I’ve come across to integrate style guides with AEM.

A week in the life of a Google Developer Expert

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All the GDEs posing at the Googleplex

A few months back, Shine’s Pablo Caif and Graham Polley were welcomed into the Google Developer Expert (GDE) program as a result of their recent work at Telstra. The projects they are working on consist of building bleeding edge big data solutions using tools like BigQuery and Cloud Dataflow on the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). You can read all about that here.

GDE acceptance comes with many benefits and privileges, one of which is a yearly trip to a private summit at a different location each year. With Google footing the bill, they bring all the GDEs (around 250 currently) from around the globe for, let’s admit it, a complete Google geek-out fest for 2 days!

This year the summit was at the Googleplex in Mountain View. Needless to say, Pablo and Graham were chomping at the bit to go. However, in addition to the summit, Google invited them to fly out prior to actual summit itself. They had lined up a few other things especially for the guys. So this was no ordinary trip. Lucky buggers!

We asked both guys to give their individual feedback on the trip, and here’s what they had to say about it. Read on if you want to hear about how the guys spent six days hanging out with Google in America.

Google Cloud Dataproc and the 17 minute train challenge

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My work commute

My commute to and from work on the train is on average 17 minutes. It’s the usual uneventful affair, where the majority of people pass the time by surfing their mobile devices, catching a few Zs, or by reading a book. I’m one of those people who like to check in with family & friends on my phone, and see what they have been up to back home in Europe, while I’ve been snug as a bug in my bed.

Stay with me here folks.

But aside from getting up to speed with the latest events from back home, I also like to catch up on the latest tech news, and in particular what’s been happening in the rapidly evolving cloud area. And this week, one news item in my AppyGeek feed immediately jumped off the screen at me. Google have launched yet another game-changing product into their cloud platform big data suite.

It’s called Cloud Dataproc.

Adobe Innovation Session (June 2015)

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As part of the Adobe Partner program, various sessions and events are organised to keep partners updated on the latest features of the Adobe Marketing Cloud platform. Best practices are also talked about in order to deliver high quality solutions to clients that invest in Adobe’s digital experience management solutions.

On June 3rd, Shine Technologies was invited to an Innovation Session with a focus on leveraging the Adobe Marketing Cloud to deliver engaging customer experiences.

Spring Data REST and Projections

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Introduction

In recent years, Spring has become much more than just a dependancy injection container and an MVC web application framework. Nowadays, it’s the go-to for building enterprise solutions due to the fact it has a fantastic community built up around it, and it has a multitude of projects that makes every developer’s life that little bit easier! In this blog post, I’m going to briefly introduce Spring Data REST, and how we used it and an unknown feature called ‘projectionson a recent project.

Confessions of a Documenter

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I’m going to confess something. I’ve been harbouring a terrible secret for the last few years. It’s something that I’ve tried to keep hidden away from my peers for a very long time so as not to be labeled as “that guy“. Something I’ve kept buried deep in the depths of my darkest closet. Ok, maybe I’m being somewhat melodramatic. Pray tell, I hear you say, what is it?!

Well, it’s that I enjoy writing documentation. From the lowliest code comments through to high level architectural documentation. I enjoy it all.