The Emergence of The 3 Towers: DevSecOps

I had the opportunity to attend AWS bootcamp in Sydney a couple of weeks ago. The session I chose to attend was entitled “Securing Cloud Workloads with DevOps Automation”. There were many interesting concepts discussed, all hinging around the new term ‘DevSecOps’. In this post, I’d like to talk about what this is and how it relates to traditional DevOps.

Google Cloud Dataproc and the 17 minute train challenge

multiple-seats

My work commute

My commute to and from work on the train is on average 17 minutes. It’s the usual uneventful affair, where the majority of people pass the time by surfing their mobile devices, catching a few Zs, or by reading a book. I’m one of those people who like to check in with family & friends on my phone, and see what they have been up to back home in Europe, while I’ve been snug as a bug in my bed.

Stay with me here folks.

But aside from getting up to speed with the latest events from back home, I also like to catch up on the latest tech news, and in particular what’s been happening in the rapidly evolving cloud area. And this week, one news item in my AppyGeek feed immediately jumped off the screen at me. Google have launched yet another game-changing product into their cloud platform big data suite.

It’s called Cloud Dataproc.

re:Invent 2015 Conference report: Welcome to the Starship Enterprise

Too cool for a suit, not cool enough for jeans and a t-shirt
Too cool for a suit, not cool enough for jeans and a t-shirt

Last week I attended the fourth re:Invent conference for Amazon Web Services in Las Vegas. During four days I got to hear some new announcements, gain insights into specific technologies and gauge the mood of the AWS ecosystem. Reflecting on the week, there is one theme that resonated with me: AWS has its eyes on the Enterprise.

Andy Jassy (SVP Web Services) himself talked about the phases of adoption of the cloud, from initial use in development, to cloud-native web applications, and finally ‘all-in’ migration of core systems. Given that adoption in the enterprise has already been significant in the first two phases, AWS’s focus has shifted to assisting the last.

So how are they going to do it? A combination of enterprise-friendly services and partnering. Let’s talk through the major new announcements.

License to Queue

licenceToKill

A few months ago I joined an exciting project with fellow Shiner Graham Polley, who you might know from such hits as Put on your streaming shoes. This is a follow-up article, discussing the elegant way in which we solved a hideous asynchronous limitation in PHP.

My role on the project was DevOps-based, and I was there to build some infrastructure using Amazon Web Services. As the cool kids would put it, I was there to put our client’s enterprise application INTO the cloud, or, more succinctly, to build a solution coupling services from two rival cloud service providers and provide a new league of scalability and flexibility.
The solution was pretty simple, but, like any simple solution, the little complexities come out along the way, and when you’re least expecting them.

Getting New Relic and RDS to play nice

Mismatched plug and socket

Anyone who’s ever had to support server infrastructure of any kind knows the value of having a comprehensive, automated monitoring solution in place. With this in mind, we have begun to roll out the New Relic platform to monitor all our AWS based servers. New Relic comes with many great monitoring metrics straight out of the box, but still has the flexibility for software developers to create their own plugins for customized metrics on just about anything your users will care about.