React Tag

A couple of weeks ago I attended ComponentsConf 2019 in Melbourne, Australia. This conference focuses on JavaScript frameworks and libraries, and I was pretty excited to attend it. This is because over the last year I have been working on a component library to be shared across a number of projects. It needs to work in everything from Drupal to Angular, and we're still trying to find the best foundation to build it on. A conference that is framework-agnostic seemed like a good place to learn more about the options that are available.

This blog post is a tutorial on how to deploy a static web application to AWS S3.

It includes a comprehensive explanation on what we're doing; hence the length! However, there will be some skipping points which you can click when you don't want to hear about lengthy explanations.

For you who like to dive into the source code directly, I've made a Github repo for this post as well.

Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011, like the date is important. We publicise the great technical work that Shine does, and raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader in the community through blogs, local meetup talks, conference presentations, and tattooing our logo on drunk developers. We curate all the noteworthy things that Shiners have been doing and publish a newsletter that nobody reads. Join us for a slightly festive edition. After all, nobody does Christmas better than corporate blogs.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011, initially as a three-piece old-school-bebop Jazz combo but expanded to include a horn section during our worldwide tour of Iceland. We publicise the great technical work that Shine does, and raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader in the community through blogs, local meetup talks, conference presentations, and driving around shouting out of car windows. We curate all the noteworthy things that Shiners have been up to and publish a newsletter that nobody reads.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011, initially to share jam-making recipes. We publicise the great technical work that Shine does, and raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader in the community through blogs, local meetup talks, and conference presentations. We curate all the noteworthy things that Shiners have been up to and publish a newsletter, this very one that you're reading right now. Hey, when you read this, whose voice do you hear in your head? Is it mine? Or yours? Everything I read is in Frank Walker from National Tiles' voice, please help me. Read on for this edition.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011, initially as a money-laundering operation. We publicise the great technical work that Shine does, and raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader in the community through blogs, local meetup talks, and conference presentations. We curate all the noteworthy things that Shiners have been up to and publish a newsletter, in accordance with a mystical schedule that you wouldn't understand. Read on for this edition.
Shine’s TEL group was established in 2011 with the aim of publicising the great technical work that Shine does, and to raise the company’s profile as a technical thought-leader in the community through blogs, local meet up talks, and conference presentations. Every now and then (it started off as being monthly, but that was too much work), we curate all the noteworthy things that Shiners have been up to, and publish a newsletter. Read on for this month's edition.

Server-side rendering a React app is a miracle on-par with childbirth and modern air travel.

OK, that opening sentence was a little over-the-top. I apologise to birth mothers and those in the aviation industry.

Let me start again: server-side rendering a React app is...kind of cool.

That said, it can be a little tricky to get started, especially if you're trying to do it with an existing app.

In this post I’ll explain one way you can implement server-side rendering (SSR) for an app that's using  React Router v4 and Redux Thunks.

Along the way we'll discuss the fundamental difference between JavaScript clients and servers, how it forces us to change the way we do routing, and the small "missing-link" that enables us to bridge React Router v4 with Redux thunks.

We'll build up a simple example to demonstrate. I'm going to assume you've got some knowledge of:

  • React
  • Redux
  • React Router v4

However, you are not required to have knowledge of:

  • Childbirth
  • Aeronautics

Let's do this.