Java

2a_02 Not so long ago, a good old username and password were considered more than enough to secure access to our applications and favourite web sites. But back then, nobody could have imagined the countless ways in which a hacker can now get a hold of our precious login credentials. From software exploits to social engineering, security has been drawn into the spotlight like never before, and software developers must really think hard about security when building any type of software solution. In this blog post, I'll explain how you can secure your Spring applications using 2FA (Two Factor Authentication).

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Introduction

In recent years, Spring has become much more than just a dependancy injection container and an MVC web application framework. Nowadays, it's the go-to for building enterprise solutions due to the fact it has a fantastic community built up around it, and it has a multitude of projects that makes every developer's life that little bit easier! In this blog post, I'm going to briefly introduce Spring Data REST, and how we used it and an unknown feature called 'projections' on a recent project.
Bq_tOGxCMAELB4k Back in June 2014, at the annual Google IO in San Francisco, Google unveiled their newest, and much hyped cloud product, Cloud Dataflow. The demo they did that day, using a live twitter feed to analyze supporter sentiment during the 2014 world cup, got my mouth watering at the prospect of working with it. It looked downright freaking awesome, and I just couldn't wait to get my hands on it to take it for a spin.
battlehack-logo WHAT A WEEKEND! I’m still recovering from the 24 hours of coding and the unhealthy amount of coffee and snacks I’ve ingested during this hackathon. Two weeks ago, Melbourne was host to the first Battlehack of 2015. “What’s a Battlehack?” I hear you ask. Well Battlehacks are competitions sponsored by Braintree (a Paypal company) where teams of developers face off over 24 hours to create the most creative hack that benefits the local or global community. The venue, which was the Plaza Ballroom on Collins St was well worth a mention. The vast ballroom was decked out with food stations, sleep and massage stations, and most importantly, our hacking stations, or tables of 4 for the long night ahead.
Rewire your brain. Do it now. That’s what Oracle wants you to do with the introduction of the Java 8 SE. Unnecessarily dramatic statements aside, the “JCP” have approved a number of new language features that bring functional programming to Java – and which Oracle are promoting so heavily, they may as well be walking around with “declarative programming is great” inked on their collective foreheads.

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Geospatial information analysis normally requires pretty complex calculations and transformations between different representation types.  The Google Maps APIs are a great tool because they hide all the complexity of these operations. However when the geospatial information that you need to analyse is not from Google Maps, things get more complicated. Operations like finding polygons representing geographical places, or finding polygons that intercept other polygons, require a lot of time and intricate code to have any acceptable  solution. At Shine we are working on a solution for a big telecommunication customer that requires being able to query large geospatial databases without degrading performance.

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Introduction

When writing complex software things don't always go as planned. You implement a new feature that works perfectly well locally and in a test environment, but when your code hits the real world everything falls apart. Sadly, that's one of the things we all have to deal with as software developers. On a recent project for a major telecommunications client we needed to be able to process more than 20 million records every night. That equated to 5GB of storage and unfortunately the environment where our process was running had up to 4GB of memory.

Processing such a vast amount of data brings a lot of challenges along with it, especially when you also need to combine it with a few more million records that are located in a database. Adding code to retrieve associated information and transform raw data might take an extra few milliseconds per each record. However, when you repeat that operation 20 million times those few milliseconds can easily turn into hours.

So there we were asking ourselves why it was taking so long. Is it an index we forgot to add to the database? A network latency problem? These things can be very hard to pin down.

We needed to think outside the box to get around this one.

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The Kick-Off Meeting

It went something along the lines of:
  • Client: "We have a new requirement for you.."
  • Shiners: "Shoot.."
  • Client: "We'd like you to come up a solution that can insert 2 million rows per hour into a database and be able to deliver real-time analytics and some have animated charts visualising it. And, it should go without saying, that it needs to be scalable so we can ramp up to 100 million per hour."
  • Shiners: [inaudible]
  • Client: "Sorry, what was that?"
  • Shiners: [inaudible]
  • Client: "You'll have to speak up guys.."
  • Shiners: "Give us 6 weeks"
We delivered it less than 4.

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Gradle is a build tool on the JVM platform that’s been gaining prominence over the last few years. Gradle’s reach doesn’t stop with JVM languages though.  The most recent releases, 1.10 and 1.11, have improved support for compiling native code (C / C++ / Objective C) and introduced support for the .NET platform. For Android projects, Google have made Gradle the de facto build tool. It’s getting a name for its flexibility, so when the opportunity came to build a single page Javascript webapp we decided to put the latest addition to the polyglot build tool arsenal through its paces.