My Big Fat UX Wedding

Or how to keep Groomzilla away

As a UX designer with a background in Law and Visual Communication, I have been solving problems for a while. Yet, little could prepare me for solving a challenge of a different kind: my very own wedding.

Well, that is what I thought.

My partner is from South Africa. I am Spanish. We met in Dublin, then moved to Melbourne and eventually decided to get married in my hometown in the Canary Islands.

The ‘problemo’? Organise an enjoyable multicultural wedding 10,000km away, without breaking the bank or losing my cool.

YOW! Connected 2016: The typed-functional future of UI platforms

I just spent a couple of days at the YOW! Connected conference and had a great time, despite nursing a bit of a cold. There were a tonne of great talks at the conference covering a wide range of topics, but in this post I’m going to briefly reflect on one specific trend that interested me at the event: the way in which UI platforms are advancing to adopt modern languages, and are even influencing each other in the process. The end-result: they’re all moving towards languages that are both functional and statically typed.

Full disclosure: This year I was a member of the programme committee for the conference. So in writing this post, there’s a bit of a risk that I’m creating an echo chamber for myself. All I can really say in my defence is that I hadn’t consciously made these connections in advance – it was only afterwards that I saw a trend!

Shiner to present at YOW! Connected 2016 – Mobile & IOT

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Shine’s Gareth Jones has been accepted to give a talk at YOW! Connected 2016 – Mobile & Internet of Things! His talk, titled ”Progressive Web Apps: What Has The Web Ever Done For Us?“, will take a look at what some believe to be the future of mobile development.

YOW! Connected 2016 will be on in Melbourne from the 5th-6th October. You can catch more details of Gareth’s talk (and his awesome bio!) over here.

 

Geekapalooza: My recent visit to Google I/O

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src: https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/105113874753230740413

Last week I had to pry myself away from my day-to-day life as a software developer and fly over the Pacific to attend Google I/O. Okay maybe I didn’t have to pry myself away – rather, it was more like me excitedly not sleeping for 2 days, giddy as a school kid, prior to leaving. I was lucky enough to be personally invited this year to both the conference and to other GDG organiser events to meet other community leaders across the globe. It’s safe to say I had high expectations.

I was expecting it to be big, but what I found was a mecca for geeks. A place where being a nerd was cool, wearing glass and wearables was not only normal but encouraged, and a place where everyone wanted to talk to you about the products they have been building and what tech stack and services made it possible. To say that I was blown away is an understatement — and this is just the people and culture surrounding the event. Let’s not forget the main reason I was there: I/O is the main stage for Google to announce their new product pipeline for the year. In this blog entry I’ll highlight the big announcements, albeit at a very high level.

Ben Teese to speak at Angular.js conference

ng-conf

Shine is proud to announce that Senior Consultant Ben Teese will be speaking at the world’s first-ever Angular.js conference in Salt Lake City in mid-January. Also known as ng-conf, it will feature members of the Angular team from Google, as well as Angular experts from around the world.

In recent years at Shine we’ve found ourselves spending an increasing amount of time building Javascript-intensive single-page apps, both for our clients and our own products. We believe frameworks like Angular represent the future in this growing space, so we’re excited to be speaking at a milestone conference like this.

We wish Ben the best of luck and if you happen to see him at the conference, make sure you say hi!

Backbone Is Not Enough

Having spent the last 18 months or so working with Backbone.js, I’ve formed the following opinion: Backbone is not enough for building large single-page applications (SPAs).

Sure, you and your team may be able to get your app across the line, but you’ll probably end up with a lot of code and may even reinvent a couple of wheels unless you’re extremely diligent about refactoring, code reviews, documentation, testing and keeping up with an ever-evolving suite of best-practices.

Testing Backbone Views with QUnit and Sinon

Clock parts

Unit-testing Backbone Views is hard. You need to cover enough for the test to be meaningful (for example DOM updates and server calls), without getting too tangled up in gory details. In this post I’ll talk about how we use QUnit and Sinon.JS to unit-test our Backbone views.

There’s already material out there on using these frameworks together, so I’m not going to get into setting things up. However, having done it for a year now I feel I’ve learnt enough additional tips, tricks and traps to warrant sharing them with the world.

This post will cover the three things you have to think about when testing Backbone Views, then talk about three strategies for simplifying your tests. I’ll also share some more general thoughts on Backbone’s suitableness for building large apps.

Backbone Boilerplate Vs. Rails Asset Pipeline

We recently shifted from Backbone Boilerplate to the Rails Asset Pipeline for generating the various assets (Javascript, CSS, HTML, images, etc) that comprise teamstuff.com, a single-page app. In this post I’ll talk about our motivations for making the shift, what we had to change to get there, and how the end result turned out.