Concordion Integration With Jenkins

Monkey_Office_1A

We recently introduced acceptance test driven development (ATDD) at a client. The idea was for the product owners, developers, and testers to work as a team to come up with the acceptance criteria for user stories before development begins. We adopted this approach as an attempt to increase a shared understanding of user stories, as well as a shared agreement on the definition of ‘done’.

As we introduced more functionality to the application, it became evident that more and more effort had to be put into regression testing prior to a software release. The application has to be supported on mobile (iOS and Android) and desktop (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, IE8 and above). Our team of 2 to 3 testers would spend up to 3 days testing for regressions! In an attempt to reduce the need for talented testers to carry out monkey work, the team began to push for a focus on automated browser-level testing.

In this post I will demonstrate the acceptance testing framework we used and describe how the test suite can be tied to a Jenkins build (with a beautiful results page!).

Supporting Fast-Moving Business Requirements Using Approval Branching

Fork in the Road

I work in a team that is constantly faced with the challenge of getting features approved for release into production. This is largely because the business is very fast moving, and business priorities change often. As priorities change, the focus of the business shifts from feature to feature, so resources for testing and approving features can be scarce. Consequently, our trunk codeline contains approved and unapproved features. This becomes a problem during our releases, because unapproved features have to be removed from trunk, which as most developers would know, is a painful process that results in dozens of conflicts.

In this blog I will present a solution to minimise the problems surrounding unapproved features in the codeline at the time of a release. This solution involves having a separate branch that only contains features that have been completed and approved by the business. I will also contrast this approach with popular alternatives like Feature Branching and Feature Toggling.